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Dogs and children

You want a dog and have young children?

Some would say that owning a dog is just like having a child; it’s true in many ways. They are a full-time commitment; requiring attention, training, feeding, care and most of all - love. But what happens when your dog isn’t the only baby in your house?

Luckily, most dogs are super friendly and playful and with the right training both your furry baby and your baby will become best friends in no time.

Labrador Retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds, and for good reason — the Labrador Retriever is playful, patient, loving, protective, and reliable. Another perk is Labs are highly intelligent and take well to training. They’re ideally suited to families and children and they love exercise. 

Dog Training

Training has many benefits, in this case it’s a win-win situation, you can ensure that your baby is safe and your dog is obedient. Granted it takes some dogs more time than others to accept children and that’s perfectly normal. Make sure not to force your dog to accept a child, they might become aggressive and anxious. Instead give them their space and let them accept a child on their own terms whilst both parties are safe of course.

Children can play a little roughly sometimes and an ear or tail tug could be perceived as too much by your dog. To help ease your dog’s anxiety occasionally and gently pull your dog’s tail or ear and reward them with a treat. This will show them that they’re safe and there’s no reason to be anxious. During this period of adjustment, if your dog does show signs of being agitated it’s best to keep your children at a safe distance.  

Bulldogs are perfect for children; they’re patient, devoted and affectionate. They’re perfect for children who like to play rough. The only downside to bulldogs is… well they’re not the most energetic. They are very loyal though.

Treats

Treats, treats and more treats! It’s a known fact that dogs love them. Giving your dog rewards whilst training them to get along with children can go a long way.  If a dog behaves well and that leads to a treat they will obviously do it again. If a dog behaves well for nothing, chances are they won’t do it again.

Guidance  

Training goes both ways; your children also need to learn how to behave around dogs. Rules should be put into place for your children for both your children and your furry baby to be happy and safe.

 When your dog is still a puppy, it’s actually easier to introduce them to children because there is a ‘learn and accept stage’. This goes hand in hand with training. Try introducing your puppy to kids in different scenarios. If you have an older dog, you might need to give him some more time and loads of treats.

Whilst dogs shouldn’t be subject to pain; children are bound to play rough sometimes. 

Bull Terriers are friendly and loving with a high threshold for pain and they’re perfect for children who are learning how to treat dogs properly.

 Top Breeds 

    1. Golden Retriever – Extremely patient, confident, smart, kind and loyal.
    2. Labrador Retriever – Playful, patient, loving, protective, reliable and take training well.
    3. Poodle – Obedient, smart, playful, adventurous and rarely bored or annoyed.
    4. Irish Setter – Playful, energetic, love being around people, play well with children.
    5. Vizsla - Obedient, confident and smart, forming close bonds with family, plays better with older children.
    6. Newfoundland - Gentle, kind, and patient and extremely intelligent.
    7. Collie – Gentle, get along great with children, sensitive, intelligent but can also be stubborn.
    8. Bull Terrier – Friendly, loving, mischievous, playful.
    9. Beagle – Calm, love the outdoors, smart, friendly and happy.
    10. Bulldog – Patient, docile, friendly and loyal

The love that dogs have for humans is out of this world. Having the privilege to grow up with a furry best friend is unexplainable. Give your kids the opportunity to experience a dog’s love at a young age and you’ll change their life forever.

*Make sure you have enough time for a dog before committing to one.